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Visit our interactive ARMEP 2.0 [https://www.armep.gwi.uni-muenchen.de/#home] map interface.

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The LMU Munich-based [http://www.uni-muenchen.de/index.html] and Humboldt Foundation-funded [https://www.humboldt-foundation.de/web/home.html] Ancient Records of Middle Eastern Polities (ARMEP) is the parent project of Official Inscriptions of the Middle East in Antiquity [ http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu/oimea/index.html] (OIMEA) and Archival Texts of the Middle East in Antiquity (ATMEA). At present, ARMEP is an umbrella project that is intended to facilitate quick and easy access to a wide range of open-access editions of ancient Middle Eastern texts. ARMEP is both an Open Richly Annotated Cuneiform Corpus [http://oracc.museum.upenn.edu] (Oracc) project and an interactive map interface [https://www.armep.gwi.uni-muenchen.de/#home].

ARMEP currently contains about 49,500 ancient texts, most of which were written in the Akkadian and Sumerian languages and in cuneiform script. Most of these inscribed composite texts and artifacts were discovered in modern-day Iraq, Syria, and Turkey, while others originate from Egypt, Iran, Lebanon, and Saudi Arabia. Although the texts range in date from ca. 2334 to 64 BC, the majority come from Neo-Assyrian (744-612 BC) and Neo-Babylonian (625-539 BC) times. The dataset is derived from the Open Richly Annotated Cuneiform Corpus (Oracc) and it includes texts from the following projects: Astronomical Diaries Digital (ADsD); Akkadian ARMEP currently contains about 41,300 ancient texts, most of which were written in the Akkadian and Sumerian languages and in cuneiform script. Most of these inscribed composite texts and artifacts were discovered in modern-day Iraq, Syria, and Turkey, while others originate from Egypt, Iran, Lebanon, and Saudi Arabia. Although the texts range in date from ca. 2334 to 64 BC, the majority come from Neo-Assyrian (744-612 BC) and Neo-Babylonian (625-539 BC) times. The dataset is derived from the Open Richly Annotated Cuneiform Corpus (Oracc) and it includes texts from the following projects: Astronomical Diaries Digital (ADsD); Akkadian Love Literature (akklove); Amarna Texts (Amarna); Bilinguals in Late Mesopotamian Scholarship (BLMS); Corpus of Ancient Mesopotamian Scholarship (CAMS); Corpus of Akkadian Shuila-Prayers online (CASPo); Cuneiform Commentaries Project (CCPo); Corpus of Kassite Sumerian Texts (CKST); Digital Corpus of Cuneiform Lexical Texts (DCCLT); Digital Corpus of Cuneiform Mathematical Texts (DCCMT); Electronic Corpus of Urartian Texts (eCUT; LMU Munich); Electronic Idrimi (idrimi); Electronic Text Corpus of Sumerian Royal Inscriptions (ETCSRI); Inscriptions of Suhu online (Suhu; LMU Munich); Old Babylonian Model Contracts (OBMC); Old Babylonian Tabular Accounts (OBTA); Royal Inscriptions of Assyria online (RIAo; LMU Munich); Royal Inscriptions of Babylonia online (RIBo; LMU Munich) Royal Inscriptions of the Neo-Assyrian Period (RINAP; UPenn and LMU Munich);State Archives of Assyria online (SAA; formerly UCL, now LMU Munich); and Text Corpus of Middle Assyrian (TCMA). Non-LMU Munich material was generously contributed by Jacob Jan de Ridder, Eckart Frahm, Shlomo Izre'el, Enrique Jiménez, Jacob Lauinger, Alan Lenzi, Reinhard Pirngruber, Eleanor Robson, Gabriella Spada, Steve Tinney, Niek Veldhuis, Nathan Wasserman, and Gábor Zólyomi. Images used in the detail views are courtesy of the Cuneiform Digital Library Initiative (CDLI). The texts can be accessed via the standard Oracc-based [/armep/pager], catalogue-style pager or via our interactive ARMEP 2.0 [https://www.armep.gwi.uni-muenchen.de/#home] map interface.

Moreover, ARMEP is also a powerful multi-project search engine that enables anyone to simultaneously search the translations, transliterations, and catalogue metadata of more than 49,500 ancient texts. As an informational and search hub, as well as interactive map interface, ARMEP strives to make a vast and varied corpus of ancient records easily and freely accessible to every scholar, student, and member of the general public.

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Visit our interactive ARMEP 2.0 [https://www.armep.gwi.uni-muenchen.de/#home] map interface.

 
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© ARMEP, 2016. ARMEP is based at the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Historisches Seminar (LMU Munich, History Department) - Alexander von Humboldt Chair for Ancient History of the Near and Middle East. Content released under a CC BY-SA 3.0 [http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/] license, 2007-14.
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